Can Green Card Holder Apply For Parents?

As a green card holder, have you ever wondered if you can apply for your parents to join you in the United States? It’s a question that many people in your position have, and the answer is not as clear-cut as you might think. Let’s dive into the details and explore whether green card holders have the option to apply for their parents.

When it comes to green card holders applying for their parents, it’s important to understand that the process can be quite complex. While it is possible for green card holders to sponsor their parents for a green card, there are a few key factors to consider. The availability of immigrant visas, the relationship between the green card holder and their parents, and the wait times can all greatly impact the outcome. It’s crucial to consult with an immigration attorney who can guide you through the process and provide you with accurate and up-to-date information based on your specific circumstances.

Can Green Card Holder Apply for Parents?

Can Green Card Holder Apply for Parents? Exploring the Process and Requirements

As a green card holder in the United States, you may be wondering if you have the ability to apply for your parents to also join you in the country. The process of sponsoring your parents for a green card involves several steps and specific requirements that need to be met. In this article, we will explore the eligibility criteria, the application process, and the potential benefits and limitations of applying for green cards for parents. We will also address common questions and concerns that green card holders may have regarding this process.

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Before diving into the details, it’s important to note that the process of sponsoring parents for a green card is only available to U.S. citizens and not green card holders. As a green card holder, you have the ability to sponsor certain family members, such as your spouse and children, but not your parents. However, there are alternative options and pathways that can potentially allow your parents to join you in the United States. Let’s explore these options in more detail.

One such option is for your parents to apply for a tourist visa to visit the United States. Tourist visas, also known as B-2 visas, allow individuals to temporarily visit the country for tourism, visiting family, or attending special events. Under this visa category, your parents can stay in the United States for a specified period, typically up to six months. However, it’s important to note that this is a temporary solution and does not grant them permanent residency or work authorization. If your parents wish to reside in the United States permanently, they would need to explore other avenues, such as obtaining an employment-based visa or applying for a green card through other eligible categories.

Exploring Other Options for Green Card Holder’s Parents

While green card holders cannot directly sponsor their parents for a green card, there are other potential pathways that can allow parents to obtain permanent residency in the United States. In this section, we will discuss some of these options in more detail.

Family Preference Categories

One potential option for green card holder’s parents is to explore the family preference categories. These categories allocate a limited number of green cards each year for certain family relationships. While immediate relatives of U.S. citizens receive priority, including parents, some of these categories also allow for the sponsorship of certain family members by green card holders. The availability of green cards in these categories is subject to annual limits and often involves waiting periods due to high demand.

To explore the family preference categories, the first step would be to determine which specific category your parents may fall under. For example, if you are a green card holder over the age of 21, you may be able to sponsor your married child for a green card, and they, in turn, can potentially sponsor your parents. However, it’s important to consult with an immigration attorney or explore the official U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) website for the most up-to-date information and guidance on the specific eligibility requirements and process for each category.

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Employment-Based Visas

Another potential option for bringing parents to the United States is through employment-based visas. If you are a green card holder who has obtained a job in the United States and your employer is willing to sponsor your parents for employment-based visas, this could be a viable pathway. Employment-based visas typically require a job offer from a U.S. employer and, in some cases, a labor certification. Your employer would need to demonstrate that there are no qualified U.S. workers available for the position and go through the necessary steps to sponsor your parents for the visa. This option provides an opportunity for your parents to work and potentially obtain permanent residency in the United States.

Diversity Visa Lottery

The Diversity Visa Lottery, also known as the Green Card Lottery, is another potential avenue for your parents to obtain permanent residency in the United States. This lottery program allocates up to 55,000 immigrant visas each year to individuals from countries with historically low rates of immigration to the United States. The program aims to diversify the immigrant population in the country. If your parents are eligible and their country of birth is on the list of eligible countries, they can enter the lottery and potentially be selected for a diversity visa. This provides them with the opportunity to obtain a green card and reside in the United States.

Humanitarian Programs

In certain cases, humanitarian programs may also provide avenues for parents to join their green card holder children in the United States. For example, if your parents are facing persecution or have been displaced from their home country due to war or natural disasters, they may be eligible for refugee or asylum status. These programs prioritize the protection of vulnerable individuals and may provide a pathway for your parents to obtain lawful status in the United States.

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Final Thoughts

While green card holders cannot directly sponsor their parents for a green card, there are alternative options and pathways that can potentially allow parents to join their children in the United States. Exploring family preference categories, employment-based visas, the diversity visa lottery, and humanitarian programs can provide avenues for parents to obtain permanent residency. It’s important to consult with an immigration attorney or explore the official USCIS website for the most accurate and up-to-date information regarding eligibility criteria and the application process for each pathway.

Bringing parents to the United States involves a complex process, and it’s crucial to ensure compliance with immigration laws and regulations. By exploring the available options and seeking professional guidance, green card holders can navigate the application process effectively and increase the chances of their parents joining them in the United States.

For further information on family-based immigration or other immigration-related topics, consult with an immigration attorney or visit the official USCIS website.

Key Takeaways

  • Green card holders can apply for their parents to receive a green card.
  • The green card holder must be over 21 years old.
  • The green card holder will be the sponsor for their parents’ application.
  • The application process involves filling out forms and providing supporting documents.
  • There may be a waiting period before the parents’ green card is approved.

Yes, a Green Card holder can apply for their parents to come and live in the United States.

To do so, the Green Card holder must be at least 21 years old and file a family-based immigration petition (Form I-130) for their parents. This process allows the parents to apply for an immigrant visa and, if approved, they can become lawful permanent residents of the U.S.


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